Archive for August, 2012

MUSIC MANAGER – WHAT DO THEY DO??….

Talent & Music Manager
 
talent manager, also known as an artist manager or band manager, is an individual or company who guides the professional career of artists in the entertainment industry. The responsibility of the talent manager is to oversee the day-to-day business affairs of an artist; advise and counsel talent concerning professional matters, long-term plans and personal decisions which may affect their career.
 
The roles and responsibilities of a talent manager vary slightly from industry to industry, as do the commissions to which the manager is entitled. For example, a music manager’s duties differ from those managers who advise actors, writers, or directors. A manager can also help artists find an agent, or help them decide when to leave their current agent and identify who to select as a new agent. Talent agents have the authority to make deals for their clients while managers usually can only informally establish connections with producers and studios but do not have the ability to negotiate contracts.
 
A music manager (or band manager) may handle career areas for bands and singers and DJs.
 
A music manager may be hired by a musician or band, or the manager may discover the band, and the relationship is usually contractually bound with mutual assurances, warranties, performances guarantees, and so forth. The manager’s main job is to help with determining decisions related to career moves, bookings, promotion, business deals, recording contracts, etc. The role of music managers can be extensive and may include similar duties to that of a press agent, promoter, booking agent, business manager (who are usually certified public accountants), tour manager, and sometimes even a personal assistant. Manager’s contracts, however, cannot license those responsibilities unto the manager in the same way a state license would empower the agent to do so.
 
Therefore, conflicting areas of interest may arise unless those are clarified in the contract. That said, a manager should be able to read and understand and explain a contracts and study up on the long-term implications of contractual agreements that they, the bands, and the people they do business with, enter into.
 

Before the manager enters into a with the band, their relationship may be regarded as competing for interest; after a good contract is signed, their interests, obligations and incentives are aligned, and the interest in success is shared. Above is more information about the ”Entertaiment & Music” industry to help and inform people.

 

Band members as managers:

 

Sometimes an experienced band member will serve as the group’s music manager until it becomes more established and a dedicated manager can be hired. Some local music managers could be considered musical agents as well, since they primarily represent the band during the booking process and receive a fixed percentage of the band’s gross income as compensation. A music manager working for a local or regional band may also have to supervise the group during a performance and make sure the venue owners meet their financial obligations.
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Multiple managers:

 

As a solo performer or band becomes more established, some of the chores previously handled by a music manager are often delegated to others. A road manager, for example, may be responsible for the performers’ travel and lodging arrangement, while a publicist takes on the task of promoting the band and advertising upcoming gigs or tour schedules. A manager’s role in a popular regional or national band may be more of a liaison between a record label and the group, or as an immediate supervisor who addresses the personal and professional needs of the band.
 

Characteristics of a good manager:

 

An effective music manager should have experience in both the creative and business side of the music industry. Musicians often respond better to managers who speak their language, while record labels and venue owners prefer to work with people who are familiar with performance contracts and other legal obligations. Music managers should not make unilateral decisions for their clients, but should also keep a client’s best interests in mind when negotiating an appearance fee or booking more gigs.
 

Manager training Training for a music manager is often a combination of on-the-job experience working for established managers and specific business training in musical management. Some traditional music programs in public colleges and universities may offer a concentration in , while vocational schools specifically geared towards the music industry often offer an intensive course of study leading to employment as a freelance music manager.

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